November 2016

Learn Guitar Scales: How To Play The Jazz Minor Scale

Learn Guitar Scales: How To Play The Jazz Minor Scale
By Mike P Hayes

How to play Jazz Minor ScaleAll the music you’ve ever heard in your life is somewhere in your head and I’m sure some of you have had the experience when you play a certain chord or sequence of notes that you are instantly reminded of a song.

This deja vu experience is a wonderful feeling and it is what happens regularly to people who play by ‘ear’; in reality playing by ear is really a case of playing from memory, your ear just sits on the side of your head and picks up signals, it’s you memory that records the sound.

The trick to developing your ability to play music accurately from memory is in large part linked to the process of actively and consciously paying close attention to everything you play.

One important way to accelerate your progress in this department is to notice the tiny distinctions in scales… sometimes only one note changes however it creates an entirely different set of harmonies.

Minor scales are one such case in point… there’s the natural minor, harmonic minor, melodic minor etc., so it’s vitally important to take your time studying each scale and it’s application to your music.

Here’s a quick review of minor scales to bring us up to speed.

* Natural minor: Also known as the Aeolian mode is produced by playing the notes of a major in alphabetical order beginning from the sixth note of the major scale until you reach it’s octave.

Beginning with a C major scale (two octave version).

C – D – E – F – G – A – B – C – D – E – F – G – A – B – C

The “A” natural minor or Aeolian mode is created by starting on

the sixth note of the C major scale.

C – D – E – F – G – [A] – B – C – D – E – F – G – [A] – B – C

The “A” natural minor scale or “A” Aeolian mode.

[A] – B – C – D – E – F – G – [A]

——————————

———————-8-[10]

————7-9-10———

-[7]-9-10——————

—————————–

—————————–

* Harmonic minor scale: Produced by simply sharpening the 7th note of the natural minor scale

[A] – B – C – D – E – F – G# – [A]

—————————–

———————-9-[10]

————7-9-10———

-[7]-9-10——————

—————————–

—————————–

* Jazz minor scale: Also known as the “real melodic minor” scale is produced by flattening the third note of the major scale that has the same name.

For example: to find the notes of the “A” jazz minor begin with the notes of an ‘A” major.

“A” major

[A] – B – C# – D – E – F# – G# – [A]

—————-2-4-[5]

——–2-3-5———

-[2]-4—————–

———————–

———————–

———————–

By simply flattening the third note of the major scale we produce the jazz minor scale or real melodic minor.

“A” jazz minor or real melodic minor

[A] – B – C – D – E – F# – G# – [A]

—————-2-4-[5]

———-3-5———-

-[2]-4-5—————

————————

————————

————————

Relating new information to data we already know produces a series of connected learning events in our brain which greatly accelerates the ability to recall the information.

Remember: everything comes back to scales… chords, arpeggios etc., are all derived from scales learn to distinguish the differences between them and you will be rewarded many times over with a much more accurate and refined musical ‘ear’.

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And now I’d like to invite you to get free access to my “How To Remember 1,000 Songs” eCourse. You can download the course for free at: http://www.guitarcoaching.com

From Mike Hayes – The Guitar Coaching Guy & the Express Guitar System

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Learn Guitar: How To Master Power Chords And Be Dangerous On Rock Guitar

Learn Guitar: How To Master Power Chords And Be Dangerous On Rock Guitar
By Mike P Hayes

Master Power ChordsThe trick with learning power chords is to create a system of connected learning so that everything you learn sits on the shoulders of something you already know, in this way you develop an easy, pain-free instant recall system.

Step 1: Identify the keynote of the chord shape – I’m going to use the standard power chord shape, notice I’m using the two note version with the keynote indicated as []

C

–x—

–x—

–x—

–5—

-[3]–

–x—

By keynote I mean the root note or the note that has the same name as the chord e.g., in this instance I’m presenting the power chord of ‘C’ therefore the note ‘C’ is shown in brackets.

Step 2: Restrict yourself to the sixth string (thickest string) and play the following note sequence entirely on that string.

C /// | F /// | Bb /// | Eb /// |

Ab ///| Db /// | F# /// | B /// |

E /// | A /// | D /// | G /// |

In this example each slash mark ( / ) represents one beat, therefore you would play the note on the first beat and count the remaining three beats.

If you need to check the location of the sixth string notes simply refer to the table below.

C = 8

F = 1

Bb = 6

Eb = 11

Ab = 4

Db = 9

F# = 2

B = 7

E = 12

A = 5

D = 10

G = 3

Step 3: Transfer the two note power chord shape to the sixth and fifth strings.

C

–x—

–x—

–x—

–10–

-[8]–

F

–x—

–x—

–x—

–3–

-[1]–

Bb

–x—

–x—

–x—

–8–

-[6]–

Eb

–x—

–x—

–x—

–13–

-[11]–

notice how the bracketed notes (the keynotes) are the same fret location as the notes shown in the table in step two.

Step 4: Use a metronome to track your progress – as you become familiar with note location on the sixth string use your metronome to help keep you in time and track your progress.

(a) begin with single notes

(b) work on two bars at a time e.g., C /// | F /// |

(c) aim to play these two bars perfectly without mistakes or buzzy notes

(d) remember to use your metronome to TRACK your progress, do not set the metronome and try to keep up with it, always remember speed is a byproduct of accuracy.

If we set the metronome too fast we will run the risk of training ourselves to make mistakes

(e) our first target tempo should be mm= 60

(f) once you can successfully play the first two bars add two more… you should now be aiming at playing the first four bars at mm =60

C /// | F /// | Bb /// | Eb /// |

Work through the entire progression gradually adding two bars ata time until you can easily play the whole sequence at mm =60.

(g) build up the tempo gradually, with the goal of increasing the tempo by 12 per week e.g., week 1 = 60, week = 72, week 3 = 84 etc., until you can play the progression at mm = 120.

(h) now try the same progression using the power chord shapes.

IMPORTANT:

* start back at the slower tempo and gradually build up to mm = 120

* I recommend using your first finger for the keynote and fourth finger; yes… I said fourth finger for the other note.

Even though it will be tough going using your fourth finger it will make it easy to play tricky chord sequences at fast tempos.

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And now I’d like to invite you to get free access to my “How To Remember 1,000 Songs” eCourse. You can download the course for free at: http://www.guitarcoaching.com

From Mike Hayes – The Guitar Coaching Guy & the Express Guitar System

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Learn Guitar: Power Chords 101 – How To Avoid The Top Mistakes

Learn Guitar: Power Chords 101 – How To Avoid The Top Mistakes
By Mike P Hayes

Learning Power ChordsPower chords are the backbone of 75% of the music played on commercial radio, this powerful sonic structure is also one of the most misused and least understood chord shapes on the guitar; let us begin at the beginning and clear up a few things so you can enjoy your guitar playing and enhance the overall ensemble sound of the groups you perform with.

First things first: Here’s four musical facts of life to get yours ears pinned on straight.

Fact 1: power chords usually refer to as a sonic structure that contains the first and fifth note of a chord.

Fact 2: only TWO notes are required to create a power chord; however most TAB sites notate power chords as a three note physical structure, the third note being an octave higher than the first note of the chord and therefore does not generate any additional harmony consequently most guitarist are struggling unnecessarily with difficult chord shapes.

Here is what I mean…

The chord of “C” contains the following notes: C – E – G, these are the first, third and fifth notes of the C major scale.

C major scale

C – D – E – F – G – A- B – C

[C] – D – [E] – F – [G] – A – B – C

While there are many variations of the power chord in use in today’s music the most common variety of power chord is designed around the first and fifth notes of the scale.

Therefore the standard C power chord would contain the notes C and G.

When played on the fifth a fourth strings of the guitar this chord shape would look like this:

C

–x—

–x—

–x—

–5—

–3—

–x—

More often than not the guitarist is presented with a three note chord containing the notes C – G – C, which looks like this on the guitar:

C

–x—

–x—

–5—

–5—

–3—

–x—

You don’t have to be Einstein to work out which shape would be easier to play and move around the fretboard. If you have been ‘doing it hard’ trying to play songs using three note power chords simply drop the extra note (highest note) and you will not only find it easier to play you will also create some additional sonic space in your music allowing your music to breathe.

Fact 3: Since it’s the third note of a chord that determines whether the chord is a major or minor chord by omitting the third note it’s possible to use the standard power chord in both situations; if however should you wish to spell out the difference between major and minor a good way to go is by designing musical structures that contain the first and third notes exclusively.

C (with first and third note – omitting the fifth)

–x—

–x—

–x—

–2—

–3—

–x—

Cm ( with first and third note – omitting the fifth)

–x—

–x—

–x—

–1—

–3—

–x—

Can you hear the difference?

Fact 4: Power chords are often indicated as “5” chords e.g.,

C5, G5, F5

or

C (no 3rd)

By understanding these few basic facts about power chords you can free up your guitar playing (goodbye to difficult chord shapes) and let your music breathe and imagination fly.

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And now I’d like to invite you to get free access to my “How To Remember 1,000 Songs” eCourse. You can download the course for free at: http://www.guitarcoaching.com

From Mike Hayes – The Guitar Coaching Guy & the Express Guitar System

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Learn Guitar Online – You Are Cheating If You Use A Capo Myth Busted

Learn Guitar Online – You Are Cheating If You Use A Capo Myth Busted
By Mike P Hayes

Capo Myth BustedAre you familiar with the phrase “capos are cheating?” This is one I often hear people say at guitar workshops or read in correspondence from my subscribers.

This is one of the most destructive phrases, simply because it sounds so close to the truth that it is difficult to spot the big lie here.

It’s hard to believe when we live in a world so rich with information that many guitarists still cling to old wives’ tales like the “capos are cheating” myth.

While most musical old wives’ tales are harmless, at least one is dangerous… because those who believe it will find themselves trapped forever in the guitar “stone age”.

In my work over the years, I have noticed that some people seem to have the ability to be able to constantly re-invent themselves and adapt to their changing musical environment.

Others seem to stay stuck in their playing, plodding over the same lumpy chords, boring licks and tricks; every song these guitarists’ play sound the same.

As I sought to understand the strategies of these different types of people, some interesting differences made themselves clear.

What follows are lists of strategies for how to remain in the guitar “stone age” and then strategies for how to move on and thrive.

How to stay in the guitar “stone age”

* Continue to struggle with hard chord shapes – playing songs using the computer generated chord shapes presented in the sheet music regardless of how difficult the stretch is… I actually know a guy who slept with corks tapped between his left hand fingers so he could increase his stretch to play difficult guitar chords!

* Suffer from bar chord-itis – a large percentage of guitarist and unfortunately “guitar teachers” have the misconception that bar chords are superior to all other shapes and those that can play bar chords are part of the guitar playing elite.

Bar chords are appropriate in certain styles of music such as ‘surf’ guitar; however the quickest way to spot a “guitar playing dinosaur” is the guy who plays bar chords in every song regardless of the style of music.

Moral of the story… lock jaw of the wrist results in lock jaw of the musical brain, sore fingers and soggy sounding chords.

How to move on and thrive

* learn the language of music – every chord have a unique spelling, it is the coagulation of a particular set of notes, once you know how to construct a chord it won’t matter whether if you use a capo or your foot as long as you have the correct notes under your fingers (or toes).

The deciding factor as to whether to use a capo or not will depend on the style of music and the atmosphere you want to create.

Here’s a few examples of how you could play an “Ab” chord.

Ab contains following notes Ab = Ab – C – Eb

Ex 1 – style – Pop, country rock…generally this is the type of acoustic guitar sound heard on commercial radio. (Taylor Swift etc.)

Ab (capo 1st fret – using a “G” shape)

-3- (Ab)

-3- (Eb)

-0- (Ab)

-0- (Eb)

-2- (C)

-3- (Ab)

=> remember I’m indicating the pitch of the notes when using a capo on the first fret! <=

Ex 2 – style – surf music…50’s and 60’s guitar instrumental music (Shadows etc)

Ab (bar chord version)

-4- (Ab)

-4- (Eb)

-5- (C)

-6- (Ab)

-6- (Eb)

-4- (Ab)

Ex 3 – style – Jazz…three note style usually associated with Count Basie band (guitarist Freddie Green)

Ab (3 note version)

-X-

-X-

-5- (C)

-1- (Eb)

-X-

-4- (Ab)

* unlock the fingerboard – in order to able to create your own chord shape it’s essential to know the position of the notes on the guitar fingerboard.

* listen to a variety of styles of music – as you listen to music concentrate on the sound the guitarist is making in each musical setting, remember there’s no right or wrong way to play a chord we’re simply wanting to contribute to the overall ensemble the best way we can.

Playing a bar chord in a Taylor Swift song won’t cut it… just as using a capo on a George Benson jazz track will spoil the overall flavor of the music.

Subscribe to my YouTube Channel – http://www.youtube.com/bestbeginnerguitar

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And now I’d like to invite you to get free access to my “How To Remember 1,000 Songs” eCourse. You can download the course for free at: http://www.guitarcoaching.com

From Mike Hayes – The Guitar Coaching Guy & the Express Guitar System

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http://EzineArticles.com/?Learn-Guitar-Online—You-Are-Cheating-If-You-Use-A-Capo-Myth-Busted&id=6904976

 

 

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Learn Guitar Online – The Top Mistakes Made When Learning Chords On Guitar

Learn Guitar Online – The Top Mistakes Made When Learning Chords On Guitar
By Mike P Hayes

Learn guitar onlineIt’s been said that a guitar is one of the few things that will actually get better if you just keep picking at it! However, if you are one of the vast majority of players whose experience trying to learn the guitar has been nothing but frustrating you might find the following tips enlightening.

Most players begin by learning a few chords on the guitar, generally this is where the frustration begins; sore fingers, difficult chord shapes and strange buzzing sounds from the guitar, if this sounds familiar… read on!

Mistake #1: difficult chord shapes – this is extremely common, even in ‘easy play’ guitar books newbie players are confronted with difficult finger stretches making it almost impossible for them to maintain a steady rhythm.

The solution: learn songs with easy chord shapes that require only minimum left hand finger movement that will enable the player to put more concentration into their rhythm and help them develop their groove.

The trick is to find ‘cool’ sounding songs with easy chords; generally the would-be player has to deal with all sorts of nursery-rhyme type songs that are very uninspiring to say the least.

Here’s a couple of ideas to get you started…

* A Horse With No Name by America (2 – chord song)

* Dreams by Fleetwood Mac (2 – chord song; excluding the guitar solo)

* Free Falling by Tom Petty (2 – chord song; well… 3 chords technically)

Ok, I think you get the idea,; I’m sure you would much rather play this type of song rather than ‘Mary Had A Little Frog” or “Hang Down You Shirt Tom Dooley”.

To get you started here are the chords for Fleetwood Mac’s hit song ‘Dreams’. (capo on the 5th fret)

C Maj7

-0-

-0-

-0-

-2-

-3-

-x-

D6/9

-0-

-0-

-2-

-0-

-x-

-x-

The chord sequence for the entire song (excluding the guitar solo) is:

CMaj7 /// | D6/9 ///

You can’t get much easier than that!

BTW the chords for the guitar solo are just as easy.

Mistake #2: random chords – are just that, isolated pieces of sonic information that don’t make musical sense, that’s why no matter how much practice some players do they never seem to make much progress.

The solution: learn the language of music – like any language music has a set of underlying principles that must be studied, absorbed and applied in order for the player to be able to successfully express themselves and communicate their ideas through their instrument.

Rather than learn ‘random’ chords a much more intelligent approach is to study chord progressions.

Continuing our analogy of music and language… chords could be thought of as musical ‘words’ and chord progressions as musical ‘sentences’.

Here are a few important chord progressions to learn:

1 – 6 – 4 – 5

1 – 3 – 4 – 5

The numbers refer to the chords (triads or scale tone seventh chord structures) created for the scale of a each individual key.

To clarify…

The 1 – 6 – 4 – 5 in the key of C would be C – Am – F – G

1 – 6 – 4 – 5 in the key of G would be G – Em – C – D

Whereas the 1 – 3 – 4 – 5 progression would result in the following:

1 – 3 – 4 – 5 key of C – would be C – Em – F – G

1 – 3 – 4 – 5 key of G – would be G – Bm – C – D

Many songs are based on these two progressions; get to know the sound of each progression and keep your ‘ear’ to the ground listening for them in songs.

Mistake #3: ‘white bread’ sounding chords – boring sounding chords generally result in loss of motivation, quite often the player misdiagnoses the problem as an issue with his/her equipment often resulting in a merry chase all over the country in search of the magic guitar (save your time and money… it doesn’t exist).

The solution: Spice up your ‘garden variety’ chords with drone strings

Here’s a few neat sounding chords in the popular guitar friendly key of “E”.

E

-0-

-0-

-1-

-2-

-2-

-0-

A2

-0-

-0-

-2-

-2-

-0-

-x-

B4

-0-

-0-

-4-

-4-

-2-

-x-

Subscribe to my YouTube Channel – http://www.youtube.com/bestbeginnerguitar

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And now I’d like to invite you to get free access to my “How To Remember 1,000 Songs” eCourse. You can download the course for free at: http://www.guitarcoaching.com

From Mike Hayes – The Guitar Coaching Guy & the Express Guitar System

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Mike_P_Hayes/55597
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Learn Guitar: How To Master The Harmonic Minor Scale And Play Like a Pro

Learn Guitar: How To Master The Harmonic Minor Scale And Play Like a Pro
By Mike P Hayes

Harmonic Minor ScaleOnce a guitarist has the natural minor scale under their fingers the next logical step in unlocking the guitar fretboard is to master the harmonic minor scale. As you probably already have discovered learning the minor scales can be quite mysterious and confusing so to make certain we don’t miss anything here is a quick review.

The natural minor (aka the Aeolian mode) contains the exact same notes as it’s parent major scale, in fact an easy way to remember the notes of the natural minor scale is to keep in mind that the natural minor scale begins on the sixth note of the major scale.

C major scale (two octaves):

C – D – E – F – G – A – B- C – D – E – F – G – A – B – C

The “A” natural minor scale identified with notes in brackets []

C – D – E – F – G – [A]-[ B]- [C] -[ D] – [E] -[ F] -[ G] -[ A] – B – C

The Aeolian mode created a different mood than it’s parent major key but did not produce any new harmonic structures (chords). Since our music system is based around the 5 – 1 cadence (perfect cadence) our musical ancestors set about creating a new scale that would give the same strong 5 – 1 progression that they had in the major key.

Here’s how it works…

Chords produced from the parent C major scale:

C – Dm – Em- F – G – Am- B dim – C

The “A” natural minor harmonies:

Am- B dim – C- Dm – Em- F – G – Am

Notice how the Aeolian mode has the same harmonic structures are the major scale only in a different sequence.

The perfect cadence challenge…

In ‘C” major the strong sense of closure is produced by the “G” moving to the “C” (5 – 1 progression); whereas in Aeolian mode version the Em to Am (5- 1 in the Aeolian mmode) produced a weak sounding cadence.

The solution:

Musicians solved the problem by sharpening the leading note (7th note) of the natural minor scale; by sharpening this one note they could change the 5th chord from a minor to a major thereby creating the intended perfect cadence.

Here’s what happened…

Harmonic structures produced from the Aeolian mode

Am- B dim – C- Dm – Em- F – G – Am

The new harmonic minor (so named because of the ‘new’ harmonies it created)

A- B- C – D – E – F – G# – A (notice the sharpened 7th note)

Produced these chords…

Am – B dim – C aug – Dm – E – F – G# dim – Am

As you can see the 5th chord in the harmonic minor progression is now a major chord and a whole new world of harmonic and melodic possibilities has been created for the creative musician to explore.

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And now I’d like to invite you to get free access to my “How To Remember 1,000 Songs” eCourse. You can download the course for free at: http://www.guitarcoaching.com

From Mike Hayes – The Guitar Coaching Guy & the Express Guitar System

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Learn Guitar: Top 7 Ways To Stay Motivated And Play Like a Pro

Learn Guitar: Top 7 Ways To Stay Motivated And Play Like a Pro
By Mike P Hayes

Top 7 Ways to Stay Motivated Learning GuitarAfter forty-one years of guitar playing you start to notice things, one of the most significant things I have observed is a number of familiar patterns or cycles newbie (and not so newbie) guitar players go through when trying to learn the guitar; one of the most common patterns is the loss of motivation eventually resulting in one of two scenarios: (1) the player gives up altogether or

(2) the would-be guitarist keeps a guitar (usually gathering dust) laying around the home… just in case they get the urge… they never do!

The player cycle goes something like this, the reason for taking up the instrument may vary but the result is almost always the same. The player gets a guitar for Christmas or birthday messes around with the guitar for a while (usually 2 to 3 weeks) then loses interest and moves on to a new adventure; occasionally the would-be guitar player pick up the guitar, strums a few out of tune chords only to confirm yet again that guitar playing is not for them.

A variation of this theme is the guitar player who has been trying to learn how to play for years without any noticeable improvement, this type of player is big on new year resolutions but throws in the towel by the end of February, I’m not criticising just merely pointing out the facts… there’s one particular player I know who has told me for five consecutive years “this is going to be the year he gets it all together”.

So how do you overcome the dreaded “loss of motivation” syndrome and avoid being one of the guitar playing casualties?

Here’s my top 7 ways to stay motivated and play like a professional guitarist

1. Maintain a positive practice experience: There’s nothing worst than a bad practice session, it’s the fastest way to lose your enthusiasm and motivation, diagnose what went wrong: was it the practice material, the equipment or practice environment, whatever the problem is change it immediately, too many bad practice experiences are fatal!

2. Rekindle your passion: Listen to the players who inspired you to take up the instrument in the first place and remember the only way they achieved their ability on their instrument is through PRACTICE, if you are as dedicated and practice as much as they did you will be able to achieve your dreams.

3. New strings: Put some new strings on your guitar they will feel better under your fingers and your guitar will sound a whole lot better.

4. Play with other guitar players: You can’t beat playing and sharing ideas with other guitar players, that’s what music is all about; caring and sharing with other humans. Computers are cool tools but they can never replace human interaction!

5. An instrument to die for: There’s nothing more motivational than having an instrument you just absolutely love to look at, it just dares you to play it… save up and get an instrument you just can’t stop playing, that does not mean the most expensive, just the most desirable!

6. Set goals: Most people give up very easy (not just guitar playing); to overcome this set goals and to achieve your goals remember you need two things (1) clarity of vision – write your goals down; (2) force of intent – guts!

7. Take lessons: Take weekly lessons from an inspiring teacher, just being around an inspiring guitarist will do wonders for your playing, remember the role of the teacher is to help guide you and help you overcome your mental and physical obstacles, they cannot do the practice for you, the best teacher in the world cannot help you if you are not committed.

Subscribe to my YouTube Channel – http://www.youtube.com/bestbeginnerguitar

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Best Beginner Guitar Lessons – https://www.bestbeginnerguitarlessons.com

And now I’d like to invite you to get free access to my “How To Remember 1,000 Songs” eCourse. You can download the course for free at: http://www.guitarcoaching.com

From Mike Hayes – The Guitar Coaching Guy & the Express Guitar System

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Learn Guitar Scales: How To Master The Natural Minor Scale And Play Like a Pro

Learn Guitar Scales: How To Master The Natural Minor Scale And Play Like a Pro
By Mike P Hayes

Master The Natural Minor ScaleThe trick with learning guitar scales is to be able to associate new information with skills you have already learned; a very confusing area of musical theory is the minor scales and their application and relevance to today’s music.

We will begin our connected learning by identifying the most commonly used minor scales:

* natural

* harmonic

* melodic

You may know many other minor scales however these are the essential ones to learn and master. The first step is to be aware that some of these basic scales have several different names, in fact you may already know how to play them and be unaware of their aliases.

Important: The natural minor is also known as the relative minor and the aeolian mode; the structure of the melodic minor in classical music is different to the melodic minor in jazz music.

In order to grasp how minor scales work and why we have so many of them we must start at the very beginning with the major scale, all my examples will originate from the C major scale.

Here is a two octave C major scale: C – D – E – F – G – A – B – C – D – E – F – G – A – B – C

The natural minor is created by beginning on the sixth note of the major scale, hence the name relative as the natural minor contains the exact same notes as the major scale.

Two octave C major scale: C – D – E – F – G – [A] – B – C – D – E – F – G – [A] – B – C

The “A” natural minor: A – B – C – D – E – F – G – A

By stacking the individual notes of any scale in a constant intervallic format e.g., 3rds, 4ths etc., each scale will produce it’s own unique set of harmonies; it’s helpful to think of scales as horizontal musical structures and chords as vertical structures.

Since the natural minor scale has the same notes as it’s parent major scale no new chords are created.

Chords created from the C major scale: C – Dm – Em – F – G – Am – Bdim – C

A minor chords: Am – Bdim – C – Dm – Em – F – G – Am

You may be thinking “what is the point of having a scale with exactly the same notes”. The answer lies in the fact that our ‘ear’ has a memory but on eyes, which means everything effects everything else; your ear retains the sounds it has just and relates all subsequent sounds to the initial reference point.

The natural minor scale produces an entirely different mood and musical atmosphere by focusing on the ‘Am” chord as the home chord (chord one).

Try this simple example to hear the effect:

The basic set of chords from C major: C – F – G – C

Modified by replacing the’ C ‘chord with an ‘Am’ chord becomes: Am – F – G – Am

Notice how quickly the mood of the piece changes by shifting our focus from the ‘C’ chord to the ‘Am’?

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And now I’d like to invite you to get free access to my “How To Remember 1,000 Songs” eCourse. You can download the course for free at: http://www.guitarcoaching.com

From Mike Hayes – The Guitar Coaching Guy & the Express Guitar System

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How to play Fly Away by John Denver – Guitar Lesson Tutorial


EZ Strummer - Learn Guitar The Easy Way
Check out this best beginner guitar lessons tutorial showing how to play Fly Away by John Denver. The intro, chords, and lyrics are shown for easy playing. I invite you to subscribe to my YouTube channel by clicking the link below. Thanks for watching. Sam Lyons, aka The Master of Teaching Guitar.

Watch The Original Video Clip

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Learn Guitar Online: How To Play the Pull-Off Technique

Learn Guitar Online: How To Play the Pull-Off Technique
By Mike P Hayes

Pull-Off TechniqueAlong with the hammer-on technique the pull-off is one of the most often used technique in guitar playing; in fact quite often the hammer-on and pull-off moves are played consecutively to create a smooth seamless guitar phrase.

Pull-off’s, like hammer-on’s (since they are essentially the same thing in reverse), expand possibilities of speed, phrasing and articulation, sound and touch; pull-off’s are equally as popular on both electric and acoustic guitar and are an essential part of the lead guitarist’s toolkit.

The technique:

The pull-off technique involves pressing down the primary note of the melodic line with the 1st, 2nd or 3rd finger while pressing down a preparatory note (higher in pitch on the same string) with either the 2nd, 3rd or 4th finger depending on the particular musical phrase.

Next, pluck the preparatory note, and while the string is vibrating, pull the finger playing the higher pitch away from the string (toward the side of the guitar fingerboard) in a plucking action. In other words, pick the string a second time with the fingering hand.

The pull-off should be strong enough to produce a solid tone approximating the loudness of the original picked note. Great care should be taken to maintain rhythmic control of the move; don’t rush or drag the tempo.

Here is a sample 1st and 2nd finger workout:

* Place your 1st finger on the 1st string at the 1st fret; place your 2nd finger at 2nd fret, 1st string.
* Hold the 1st finger down for both notes.
* Pick the 1st note and pull-off with your 2nd finger
* Repeat this exercise on every string

Important: The notes in this exercise should be played as eighth notes, remember to use a metronome when practising (1 click = 2 notes).

2nd and 3rd finger workout:

* Place your 2nd finger on the 1st string at the 2nd fret, place your 3rd finger at the 3rd fret, 1st string
* Hold 2nd finger down for both notes
* Pick down for the first note and pull-off with your 3rd finger
* repeat this exercise on every string

Important: The notes in this exercise should be played as eighth notes, remember to use a metronome when practising (1 click = 2 notes).

1st, 2nd and 3rd finger workout

* Place your 1st finger at the 1st fret, 2nd finger at the 2nd fret, 3rd finger at the 3rd fret, all played on the 1st string
* Hold 1st finger down for all notes
* Pick down for the 1st note and pull-off with your 3rd finger and then your 2nd fingerboard
* Think of the word ‘pine-ap-ple’ to get the rhythm for this exercise
* Repeat the exercise on every string

Subscribe to my YouTube Channel – http://www.youtube.com/bestbeginnerguitar

Like Me on Facebook – http://www.facebook.com/guitarlessonsbeginner

Follow me on Twitter – http://www.twitter.com/musizman

Best Beginner Guitar Lessons – https://www.bestbeginnerguitarlessons.com

And now I’d like to invite you to get free access to my “How To Remember 1,000 Songs” eCourse. You can download the course for free at: http://www.guitarcoaching.com

From Mike Hayes – The Guitar Coaching Guy & the Express Guitar System

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Mike_P_Hayes/55597
http://EzineArticles.com/?Learn-Guitar-Online:-How-To-Play-the-Pull-Off-Technique&id=6012410

 

 

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